Published: August 9, 2017

A recent article in the New York Times describes some choices made by professionals of unique forms of retirement. Each of the individuals profiled in the article stopped what they had been doing for many years, but continued to be actively involved in what most people would call work. One, a doctor, became a "temp" doctor, filling in for other doctors and spending more time on outdoor activities. Another embarked on a years long project of researching and writing a history of his family, while a third used his legal training to work in a nonprofit organization dealing with climate change.

. . . . . .

Published: June 26, 2017

One of the biggest missteps of clients is to create a trust without communicating its purpose with the adult beneficiaries. Without guidance from the client/grantor and his or advisors, beneficiaries sometimes become suspicious that they have been isolated from decisions. They may also suspect that the trust was formed for purposes that are not in their best interests. As a consequence, they may try to destroy long-term relationships with trustees, investment advisors and other beneficiaries. They may also try to destroy the trust.

. . . . . .

Published: June 6, 2017

Many people hope to make up for not saving enough for retirement by just saying: "I'll work past retirement age" or "I'll never retire". A recent report from the Employee Benefit Research Institute on its 2017 Retirement Confidence Survey suggests a different reality. Workers continue to predict a median retirement age of 65, while retirees report a median retirement age of 62. The report indicates that, despite their plans, many people retire unexpectedly.

. . . . . .

Published: April 22, 2017

St. Joseph's University's Initiative for Family Business and Entrepreneurship hosted business consultant Jeff Grimshaw at its Dine With The Dean breakfast meeting on Thursday, April 20. After remarks by the Dean, Joseph DiAngelo, Jr., Mr. Grimshaw discussed how leaders affect culture in a business in five ways: their decisions and actions; what they reward and recognize; what they tolerate, or don't; how they behave informally; and their formal communications.

. . . . . .

Published: April 4, 2017

I've written before about beer, specifically the program at St. Joseph University's Initiative for Family Business and Entrepreneurship that featured members of the Yuengling family, whose business is growing. But apparently the opposite can also happen. A recent article in the New York Times describes the downfall of the Stroh brewing empire, and references a book by a member of the family: "Beer Money: A Memoir of Privilege and Loss", by Frances Stroh. It took many missteps to reduce the fortunes of a family that owned the third largest beer company in America.

. . . . . .

Published: March 24, 2017

If you live in the Philadelphia area, you know DiBruno Brothers, "the House of Cheese", where you can buy not only great cheese but everything else you can imagine in an Italian grocery and delicatessen. St.

. . . . . .

Published: March 6, 2017

No; of course not. Some people choose to continue to work full-time after reaching what many would consider retirement age, such as 65. And more than a few people have to work. But others look forward to the absence of daily work. One of my co-workers told me she would be happy to sit on her front porch with a cup of coffee once she was able to retire. But others like at least some aspects of their working life, and want to continue it. An article in the New York Times of Sunday, March 5, 2017 offers examples of people who view continued work as a healthy and enjoyable thing.

. . . . . .

Published: March 4, 2017

There is so much being written about retirement these days, in large part because of the bulge of baby boomers now reaching and past retirement. My experience has been that many people fear retirement, because they think it's the end of their useful life and just a stage of waiting for inevitable decline. But the reaction of many, maybe most, people who have retired is very different: they experience retirement as full of new opportunities and a stage in life that rewards careful planning. Careful planning is arriving on a daily basis through books, articles and other media.

. . . . . .

Published: March 2, 2017

I've written before about the Haub School of Business at St. Joseph's University and its Initiative for Family Business and Entrepreneurship. Another program was presented on February 23 on the St. Joe's campus, titled Building Shared Mission, Vision & Values. The program began with a discussion of shared family values by IFBE's Director, Mary Nicoletti. This was followed by a panel discussion featuring two family business members of IFBE's Advisory Board, Taylor Fernley and Reshma Moorthy, together with Marc Kramer, the Family Business Executive in Residence.

. . . . . .

Published: January 29, 2017

As we enter the beginning of a new administration in Washington, many provisons of federal law are being considered for possible changes. At this point (January 28, 2017) it's not possible to say what will be changed and when, but it is important to be ready for change and to take advantage of opportunities it presents and avoid problems it creates. We will try to anticipate these changes as soon as we know enough to be helpful, but meanwhile consider these areas of possible change:

. . . . . .