Judith Grubner, Howard Swibel provide IP advice for Emmy winning documentary on attempted 1970's neo-Nazi march in Skokie now airing on public TV stations

Judith Grubner, Howard Swibel provide IP advice for Emmy winning documentary on attempted 1970's neo-Nazi march in Skokie now airing on public TV stations
April 30, 2014

Arnstein & Lehr Chicago Partners Judith L. Grubner and Howard J. Swibel provided contractual and intellectual property advice to the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Educational Center, which produced the documentary “Skokie Invaded but not Conquered.” The film examines the personalities and issues connected to the attempted neo-Nazi march in Skokie in the late 1970s. It was awarded an Emmy for best documentary in the Midwest and began broadcasting this past weekend in more than 200 PBS-affiliated stations in 115 markets across the country. Arnstein & Lehr is recognized for its efforts in the documentaries credits.   It aired on WTTW-TV Friday and Sunday in Chicago and is scheduled to air again in Chicago on April 28 at 7 p.m., April 29 at 12 a.m., and May 5 at 4 a.m.   It will also air on WEDU in Tampa on April 29 at 9 a.m. and 3 p.m.; on WXEL in West Palm Beach on April 29 at 3 p.m. and May 5 at 5 a.m.; and, on WPBT2 in Miami on May 5 at 5 a.m.   The documentary, written to coincide with the 35th anniversary of these events, makes extensive use of archival footage and contemporary interviews to reveal how a debate over First Amendment rights inspired Holocaust survivors to become activists.    “Even for those who consider themselves familiar with the events of Skokie, this film reveals so much more to the story,” said Rick Hirschhaut, co-executive producer of the film and founding executive director of the Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center. “Above all, the courage and spirit of the survivors stands triumphant. Their dignified response to the threat of neo-Nazis in their community awoke the conscience of our nation to the sanctity of memory and the imperative of standing up to hate. A generation has come of age inspired by their poignant example of the best of humanity,” he added.                             The film’s co-executive producer, Todd Whitman, said, “Many aren’t aware that in 1977, quiet and peaceful Skokie—a haven for Holocaust survivors—was shaken to its core when a small group of neo-Nazis tried to march there. This attracted national and international attention, leading to landmark legal cases. It never ceases to amaze me when looking at the shocking scenes of overt racism demonstrated by the Chicago Nazi group, nearly ending in violent and tragic results.”   “The Illinois Holocaust Museum and its educational mission were born from the efforts of survivors in response to the attempted march,” said Susan Abrams, incoming CEO of the Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center. “The Museum’s permanent exhibition ends with a small exhibit about this historic turning point and the effects it has had on the greater Chicago area and the nation as a whole. We are pleased to share this story with others across the country through the documentary film.”

To view the trailer for the documentary, please click here.